John McKenzie

About John McKenzie

John McKenzie is a trained clinical hypnotherapist working out of his office in Cheshire. He holds a Hypnotherapy Practitioner Diploma from the National Council for Hypnotherapy and adhere's to the Council's strict code of conduct.

Sleep texting – what’s that about?

Sleep texting? Surely that’s got to be a made-up story? And if it isn’t what on earth is going on?

5 steps to greater optimism

Our ‘internal conversation’ is perhaps the greatest influence on our day-to-day lives – but what if you’re stuck listening to a nay-saying pessimist? The good news is that optimism is a skill that can be learned.

Hypnotherapy for sweating – a case study

Anna* was sceptical when she came to see me. “You’ve been recommended by a few people” she told me, “but I don’t really think you can help me. Can you provide hypnotherapy for sweating problems?”

Revision – 6 tips to help children

Revision isn’t just a chance for children to get ready for exams – it’s a chance for them to learn how to cope with pressure, and to develop their emotional resilience. So how can you help them best?

Objectophilia – the things we love

What have all of these got in common? Duvet. Car. Railway station. The Eiffel Tower. Hologram. Doll. Full marks if your answer was “they’re all automatically suggested when you google ‘man marries’ or ‘woman marries’”. Welcome to the world of objectophilia.

4 tips for childrens’ screen time

Screen time for children is an increasing public health issue, with potential links to increased obesity, sleep problems, and effects on social and learning skills. To help parents the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) has published their first ever guidelines .

5 tips for greater gratitude

Gratitude is having a bit of a moment, with on-line courses and printed ‘gratitude journals’ freely available and strongly marketed. However, there is evidence of a real association between increasing gratitude and increasing wellbeing.

Short term memory – a case study

Jane* was terrified when she came to see me. Not of me personally you understand, but of what she was convinced was wrong with her.

Drinking – a case study

Charles* was angry when he came to see me. He was angry to have been asked to come, angry to be there, and angry to have to be expected to talk to me. He didn’t have to be angry though – as I reminded him, he didn’t even have to be there.

Post natal depression – a case study

Joe* came to see me with the same sort of thoughts that a lot of people have – that he was wrong to feel anxious or depressed. Like them he didn’t simply struggle with his feelings, but beat himself up about being anxious or depressed, and end up feeling twice as bad. And just like them, Joe felt that whilst other people might be different, for him it was definitely wrong.